Exxon Mobil – Africa

Sector: Oil and gas
Equipment: A1200 Rocket Composter

The backstory

Exxon Mobil is one of the world’s largest oil and gas companies, and one of the firm’s projects included laying a 1000km gas pipeline in Chad – spanning three oilfields to the shores of Cameroon.

A development of such magnitude required a lot of manpower, which meant there were a number of camps and centralised canteens placed along the route for workers. This is where the business needed help from the team here at Tidy Planet…

The challenge

The primary task for the firm was figuring out what to do with the vast volumes of food waste leftovers being generated within the canteens – which saw thousands of workers dining there each day. But no matter what, the solution had to allow the site to close the loop of this waste stream efficiently, safely, and sustainably.

Exxon Mobil also found it needed a way to deal with organic wastage, that wouldn’t attract vermin, and in turn, snakes, to the pipeline’s location – ensuring the full health and safety of all its workforce.

Additionally, given that the waste disposal infrastructure in the country is minimal, dependency upon landfill sites is high, but the organisation required a more environmentally friendly answer.

The solution

In a bid to help the site prevent vermin and make a valuable resource out of its food waste, we recommended an A1200 Rocket Composter – in-vessel food waste recycling equipment that would convert any wastage into compost in just 14 days.

The industrial-scale machinery not only allows the oilfield canteens to process their leftovers at source, and improve the site’s health and safety credentials, but – in conjunction with shredded waste wood – convert the material into a soil improver.

This is the perfect solution for the site, given that some of the surrounding land has experienced great levels of disruption – when laying the 75cm-wide steel pipes – it needed repair and rejuvenation. The compost resource produced by their on-site Rocket is ideal and has proven to be the most effective medium to help with this large-scale, African land remediation venture.